guidance

Cinemas and Theatres, Security and Continuity Advice

 
Cinemas, theatres and concert halls offer terrorists and organised criminals a range of potentially significant targets. For cinemas and theatres, premieres and opening nights are high profile events, and they – like concert halls – frequently have the honour of welcoming members many distinguished guests and Business Continuity and Security awareness is a must!
 
The contents of a film or a play may be contentious and many of the buildings are architecturally renowned, enjoying something approaching iconic status, not only within their communities, but nationally and even internationally.
 

Security | Protecting Places of Worship

 
This guide is intended to give protective security advice to those who are responsible for security in places of worship. It is aimed at those places where there may be a risk of a terrorist attack either because of the nature of the place of worship or the number of people who congregate in it.
 
The guide seeks to reduce the risk of a terrorist attack and limit the damage an attack might cause. It highlights the vital part you can play in the UK counter terrorism strategy.
 

Protection for business and commercial centres

 
 
This guide is intended to give protective security advice to those who are responsible for security in commercial centres. It is aimed at those places where there may be a risk of a terrorist attack either because of the nature of the building, it's location or the number of people who work in it.
 
The guide seeks to reduce the risk of a terrorist attack and limit the damage an attack might cause. It highlights the vital part you can play in the UK counter terrorism strategy.
 
It is accepted that the concept of absolute security is almost impossible to achieve in combating the threat of terrorism, but it is possible, through the use of this guidance, to reduce the risk to as low as reasonably practicable.
 

Supply Chain Continuity using new ISO 22318 Guidelines

New guidance from ISO and the BSI to help companies build resilience and continuity in their supply chains PD ISO/TS 22318:2015 - Overview of new ISO Supply Chain Continuity Guidance

An Introduction by Lead author Duncan Ford MBCI

BSi has just published the UK edition of the recently released ISO Technical Specification 22318 Guidelines for Supply Chain Continuity. The title describes where this document fits in with the established BCM standards 22301 and 22313.  A technical specification is not a full standard; its purpose is to amplify not undermine the established standards.

Every organisation has a supply chain which may range from the purchase of basic resources to complex outsourcing arrangements for the delivery of a core service including both external suppliers and internal support such as the provision of IT services.  Each of these arrangements presents a risk to the organisation if it is unavailable, which needs to be properly understood and appropriate contingency measures put in place to protect against disruption of that product supply or service. 22318 provides guidelines on how to manage Supply Chain Continuity challenges.

The scope of this Technical Specification was deliberately constrained. It considers specifically the issues faced by an organisation which needs continuity of supply of products or services to protect its business activities and the continuity strategies for current suppliers which can be used to mitigate the impact of disruption.

The approach is broken into five stages which align with the requirements of BS/ISO 22301 which ensures that Supply Chain Continuity Management (SCCM) can be managed within an established BCM programme:

Ø  Policy and strategy which considers the requirement for supply chain continuity and the parameters each organisation should define to frame its approach to SCCM.

Ø  Analysis of the supply chain which draws upon the organisation’s BIA to identify critical activities or processes and focusses on identifying the particular risks and impacts to these processes arising from disruption in the associated supply chain.

Ø  Consideration of appropriate and achievable Supply Chain Continuity strategies which can help to mitigate the emerging risks and identify an approach to manage disruption.

Ø  Planning to manage a supply chain disruption event and the requirement to integrate this with BC plans.

Ø  Ongoing performance management to maintain an appropriate level of continuity management within the supply chain and deliver continuous improvement.

Effective SCCM generates its own challenges for an organisation, it may impact procurement strategies as continuity requirements may be contrary to strategies of minimising supply chain cost.  The process of analysis should bring a focus onto the pressure points, for example where a critical process is dependent on a single supplier, and allow the associated risk to the organisation to be recognised and managed.

A key approach is to encourage openness between an organisation and its critical suppliers delivering better understanding of each other’s priorities and risks and integrated continuity planning. This leads to continuous improvement and reducing risk.

SCCM is relevant to organisations of every size and type, TS 22318 focusses on a key aspect of managing the risks in the supply chain.

As an ISO document it is available as reference to support global supply arrangements helping the purchaser to define its continuity requirements to be included in contracts, monitor suppliers’ continuity provisions and be prepared to manage the impacts of disruption. The hope of the project team who worked on this document supported by the contributions from many global standards organisations is that PD ISO/TS 22318 takes another step towards improved global continuity and resilience.

To get a copy of the new Supply Chain Continuity Guidance please click here

Visit the BSI shop to get your copy of BS/ISO 22318

About the Author

 

Duncan Ford led the development for ISO TS 22318. He is a partner in Corpress LLP a consultancy working in the areas of risk, response and resilience including supply chain analysis.

For more information visit: www.corpress.uk

 

Exercise Watermark underway

 

Over the next week the largest ever civil protection exercise in the UK gets underway. The Exercise, called Watermark, involves 10 government departments, 34 resilience forums and many teams from emergency planning, water and energy companies, hospitals and schools as well as a host of Business Continuity professionals coming together to test their preparedness against a range of different flooding Sceanrios.
 
Exercise Watermark is supported by DEFRA, who are contributing £820,000 to the emergency services, charities and others to help pay for flood rescue equipment and training. All of the equipment will be added to the National asset register for flood rescue resources and will be called upon in the event of major flooding events.
 

Security and Continuity for Major Events

 
This guide is intended to give protective security and Business Continuity advice to those who are responsible for organising major events and event security, irrespective of size and capacity and is not specific to any particular type of event.
 
This advice is aimed at those events where there may be a risk of a terrorist attack either because of the nature of the event or the number or nature of the people who host or attend it. It highlights the vital part you can play in the UK counter terrorism strategy.
 
Terrorism also includes threats or hoaxes designed to frighten and intimidate. These 

Security and Continuity advice for Aviation including Flying Clubs and owners

 
The ‘General Aviation’ sector is extremely diverse. It involves aircraft such as balloons and airships, gliders, micro-lights, helicopters, light aircraft and business jets. Their activities cover anything from agricultural use, aerial surveys, delivery of goods, corporate flights and leisure. The aerodromes that support these activities vary from individual landing strips or helipads to regional airports.
 
This guide is intended to give protective business continuity and security advice to those who work within the General Aviation sector to reduce the opportunity of a terrorist attack occurring, or limit the damage such an event might cause. It also contains crime prevention material and guidance on business continuity. This advice is not mandatory but may assist those engaged within the sector to enhance security to an appropriate level at their site.
 

Protecting Hotels and Restaurants

 
This guide provides protective security and business continuity advice to those who own, operate, manage or work in hotels and restaurants. It aids those who are seeking to reduce the risk of a terrorist attack and limit the damage an attack might cause. It highlights the vital part you can play in the UK counter terrorism strategy.
 
Hotels and restaurants worldwide have been subject to terrorist attacks on several occasions. It is possible that your hotel or restaurant could be involved in a terrorist incident. This might include having to deal with a bomb threat or with suspect items left in or around your premises or sent through the post.
 

Security and the Health Sector

 
This guidance has been developed to assist the health sector in addressing a range of security issues relating to possibility of a terrorist attack to a crowded place within their site. The advice provided in this booklet is built on knowledge, learning and best practice developed between the National Counter Terrorism Security Office, health sector security professionals including the NHS Counter Fraud and Security Management Service (NHS England), and representatives from the devolved health care administrations across the UK.
 

Security Advice for Universities and Colleges

 
This guidance has been developed to assist the higher and further education sectors in addressing the security issues relating to terrorist attacks.
 
It is the product of discussions and sharing of best practice involving the National Counter Terrorism Security Office together with representatives from UK universities and colleges.
 
We want our Higher and Further institutions to be places where all students and staff are safe and secure and able to foster a culture of shared values and open debate to cohere the rightly celebrated diversity of the sector. But there is a real and serious threat of terrorist attacks in the UK and terrorism can come in many forms, not just a physical attack on life and limb. It can include interference with vital information or communication systems, causing disruption and economic damage. This guidance helps those with the responsibility for Security, Business Continuity and Contingency planning met their obligations. 
 

Protecting bars, pubs and nightclubs

 
This guide provides protective security advice to those who own, operate, manage or work in bars, pubs and nightclubs. It aids those seeking to reduce the risk of a terrorist attack, reduce the risk to patrons and limit the damage an attack might cause. It highlights the vital part you can play in the UK counter terrorism strategy.
 
Terrorist attacks in the UK are a real and serious danger. Crowded places, including bars, pubs and nightclubs are likely to feature in the attack plans of terrorist organisations in the future; as they are usually locations with limited protective security measures and therefore afford the potential for mass fatalities and casualties.
 
Although attacks have so far been infrequent, it is possible that your shopping centre could be involved in a terrorist incident. This might include having to deal with a bomb threat or with suspect items sent through the post or left in or around the centre.
 

Protecting Retail Shopping environments

 
This guide provides protective security advice to those who own, operate, manage or work in shopping centres. It aids centres which are seeking to reduce the risk of a terrorist attack and limit the damage an attack might cause. It highlights the vital part you can play in the UK counter terrorism strategy.
 
Terrorist attacks in the UK are a real and serious danger. Crowded places, including shopping centres, are likely to feature in the attack plans of terrorist organisations in the future; as they are usually locations with limited protective security measures and therefore afford the potential for mass fatalities and casualties.
 
Although attacks have so far been infrequent, it is possible that your shopping centre could be involved in a terrorist incident. This might include having to deal with a bomb threat or with suspect items sent through the post or left in or around the centre.
 

CTSA CONTACTS

 
This page provides links to you local Counter Terrorism Security Advisers located across the country.  They can provide you with specific advice based on the local and business needs. They can also be reached through your local police control room or switchboard. Do not use 999 unless it is a genuine emergency.
 
Links to CTSA Websites:

Latest Strategic guidance on Building decontamination for CBRN

 
The guidance is part of sensible contingency and business continuity planning and does not mean that there is an increased risk of terrorist attack using CBRN materials. It gives basic information on the decontamination and remediation that may be required following a deliberate or accidental release in the UK as outlined below. 
 
This document replaces guidance published in 2004 by the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, and the Office of the Deputy Prime Minister (now the Department for Communities and Local Government).
 

Designing for Counter-terrorism - RIBA guidance

 
This document provides Business Continuity guidance from RIBA on designing for Counter-terrorism and Resilience.
 
The guidance comes in two parts and will be valuable to all those working in the areas of Business Continuity, Resilience and Security, as well as the professionals building our communities. 
 
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